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Commit 831b3a2b authored by Wigal, Jacob (CIV)'s avatar Wigal, Jacob (CIV)

incorporated new edits, left off after image of diff

parent db92854f
......@@ -30,14 +30,13 @@
"<ul>\n",
"\n",
"Using <b>git</b> and <b>GitLab</b> is one way to do these three things. Together, they can:<br>\n",
" 1. store and share data and code<br>\n",
" 2. enable users to see others work, edit, and comment<br>\n",
" 3. enable distributed version control of files<br>\n",
" 1. store and share data and code;<br>\n",
" 2. enable users to see, edit, and comment other's work without overwriting files; and,<br>\n",
" 3. enable distributed version control and passoword protection of key files.<br>\n",
" <br>\n",
" </font>\n",
" <font size=\"3\">\n",
" Some quick definitions: <i>Git</i> is the software or command-line system that keeps track of files and file changes. <i>GitLab</i> is a server with a user interface that allows us to easily view and share a repository in the cloud. It also adds many more features like password protection and wikis.\n",
" </font>"
"\n",
"<b>But first... some quick definitions:</b> [Git](https://git-scm.com/) is version control software (VCS) that enables people to use simple commands to keep track of files and file changes. When you edit a file, git helps you keep track of exactly what changed, who changed it, and why. [GitLab](https://about.gitlab.com/) is a deployment of git to a cloud server that has a user interface showing files and tracked changes. It allows multiple users to easily view edits tracked by git in the cloud. It also adds many more features like password protection and wikis. [GitHub](https://github.com/), which you may have heard of before, is a website and online platform similar to GitLab.\n",
"</font> "
]
},
{
......@@ -47,18 +46,22 @@
"<h2>Why we are using git</h2>\n",
"\n",
"<font size=\"3\">\n",
"We make changes to files all the time. Many times this is not an issue, such as if you are writing a letter in Microsoft Word. You can pick up right where you left off when you double click your document. You can edit the file, save it, and if you see yourself make a mistake you can \"undo\". You are at least mostly aware of how your Word document has changed over time as you were the only one editing it. \n",
"We make changes to files all the time. Most changes we make (even mistakes) are not a big issue when a single person is in control of the file and its management. For example, when you write a report in Microsoft Word, you can pick up where you last saved the document. You can edit the file, save it, and if you see yourself make a mistake, you can \"undo\". You are fully aware of how your Word document has changed over time.\n",
" <br>\n",
" <br>\n",
"Moving to a distributed, simultaneous file-sharing system with multiple users and organizations turns this workflow upside-down. In a distributed setting, there are a lot of different people who may want to edit your file. They may not know what changes you made in the past and may make changes that you do not notice. It is also easy for multiple people to work on the same file and make conflicting changes that do not work well together (e.g., simulataneous edits to the same sentence or paragraph in a report). In worst-case situations, one person may overwrite a file and lose important information without knowing and with no possibility of an \"undo\". Even if changes are tracked, files may have long version histories that are nearly impossible to make sense of.\n",
" <br>\n",
"For our workflow this paradigm is turned upside-down. There are a lot of different people who want to pick up right where you left off. When you edit geospatial datasets it overwrites files without an \"undo\". Files have long vesion histories that are nearly impossible for one person to keep track of. This is where git comes in.\n",
" <br>\n",
" <i>This</i> is where git comes in.\n",
" <br>\n",
" Git tracks all changes people make to files. A change to a file in git is called a <i>commit.</i> With every change someone makes to a file, git requires you to write a little message about the change called a \"commit message\". Everyone can see every single commit and commit message, as well as download or revert to old versions. Everyone can also \"pull\" new changes to their files or jump forward to newer versions. Git also can show you exactly what has changed between versions of a file in what git calls a <i>diff.</i>\n",
" </font> \n",
" <br>\n",
" In general, git forces users to be deliberate about how they change files and tracks all changes people make to files. A change to a file in git is called a <i>commit</i>. With every commit, git also requires you to write a message about the change you are making called a <i>commit message</i>. Every commit and commit message helps explain what happened between each version of the same file. Everyone with access to the file can see every commit and commit message, as well as download or revert to old versions of the file at any time. Git also enables users to <i>pull</i> other people's changes into their files, or update files with newer versions. \n",
" <br>\n",
" <font size=\"3\">\n",
" \n",
"Below is an example of a diff showing changes someone made to a text file called index.md. This diff shows us the updating_the_geo_nodes.md line was <font color='red'> deleted </font> and the version_specific_updates.md line was <font color='green'> added </font>. \n",
" <br>\n",
" Git also automatically produces an output called a <i>diff</i> that shows the line-by-line edits made in each commit. Diffs pinpoint the exact differences between file versions and provide a powerful way to understand version details and commit messages left by users. \n",
" <br>\n",
" <br> \n",
"Below is an example of a diff showing changes someone made to a text file called index.md. This diff shows us the updating_the_geo_nodes.md line was <font color='red'> deleted </font> and the version_specific_updates.md line was <font color='green'> added </font>. Notice how this diff identifies only the exact part of the line that changed, as the \"<b>ing</b>\" stays the same between commits!\n",
" </font>\n",
"\n"
]
......
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